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The best pillowcases for your skin

The best pillowcases for your skin

Why Specifically for Skin?

Sometimes, it’s the things easiest to overlook that cause the most damage. This is often true of the bedding we choose and the negative effects it can have on skin and hair. You can spend hours brushing, finessing, moisturizing, oiling, and doing all sorts of other treatments to your hair. You can wash, tone, deep clean, and exfoliate your skin. But if you’re not taking care of that skin at all times, it’s an exercise in futility.

Sleeping on a cotton pillowcase can actually lead to dry skin, which can cause itching, redness, rash, scaling and peeling, and other irritation. None of this is good for skin and spending eight hours a night – and sometimes more – with your face pressed to a material that strips it of necessary oils and minerals can be detrimental. It can make you age faster, showing wrinkles sooner, and take away that fullness, softness, and brightness that comes with youthful skin.

Instead, you should focus on materials that will ease the aging process. There are actually pillowcases for skin that will assist with keeping it moisturised and infused with the important vitamins and amino acids to enliven your appearance and make you look younger than you are.

Even dermatologists agree that sleeping on silk pillowcases can help reduce and even reverse the aging process, keeping skin as well as hair healthier longer. Silk has a lot of properties that are ideal for skin, or if you have trouble with the idea of the price of pure silk, satin (woven from polyester) imitates a number of these features.

What Makes the Best Pillowcases for Skin the Best?

Let’s consider the properties of silk – and in many cases, satin – pillowcases that make them the best pillowcases for the skin.

Wrinkle Resistant

One of the biggest problems with waking up in the morning after a hard sleep is looking in the mirror and seeing creases on your face from the way the pillowcase wrinkles while you sleep. As if the initial appearance isn’t bad enough, these particular marks seem to last forever and can be very embarrassing.

Silk and satin pillows are smooth and slippery, with wrinkle resistant properties that avoid the ‘pillow’ marks on your face when you’ve had a particularly difficult night or slept harder than usual.

Long Term Age Defiance

Even more important, silk helps reduce age-related wrinkles by infusing skin with much needed natural properties. The anti-aging formulas used in night creams and other facial products contain amino acids that help keep skin young and healthy, giving it a glowing appearance and a certain shine. Silk contains the same amino acids, so your skin and hair become infused with these through the night, giving you eight hours of therapy when you choose the right pillow case rather than just a few minutes a day.

Moisture

A number of materials literally drain away oils and moisture from your already dry skin. Silk and satin do the opposite. Because they are not dry and absorbent, you’ll find that your skin stays moist longer, with less irritation, which not only aids in overall skin health but keeps you younger and fresher longer. You’ll have fewer rashes, less peeling and scaly skin, and more balanced skin hygiene, even reducing the oiliness of certain spots on your face.

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Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Now we are officially entering the second lockdown in the UK M6 Beds have put together a few tips and tricks for getting your sleep cycle back into a routine.

You might have noticed your normal sleep pattern has changed. Some of us may be sleeping more, and some of us may be sleeping less. Life has changed dramatically for many of us, with our usual daily routine – including commutes, meal times, and the amount of time we spend outside – being altered because of self isolation.

  • Don’t use your bedroom as your office (if possible) When it’s time for bed, remove electronic devices and make the room cool, dark and quiet. It’s important to associate your bedroom as the place you go to sleep, not the place you work or watch TV. This will help you to relax and prepare for sleep. Electronic devices also emit artificial light that can influence our sleep cycle. Artificial light can trick your circadian clock into thinking daylight has been extended and alter our quality of sleep. If you need electronic devices nearby, place them in night mode.
  • Avoid napping As you try to establish your new routine, it’s important to engage with your natural circadian rhythm – and napping could potentially disrupt this at the beginning. However, if your previous night’s sleep was poor you may feel more tired after lunch. Short naps – less than 20 minutes – can help to restore cognitive function and may make you feel less sleepy.
  • Exercise Both aerobic and resistance exercise has been shown to have positive effects on sleep. However, timing is important. It’s best to avoid vigorous exercise one hour before bedtime as this may reduce our sleep duration, quality and make it more difficult to fall asleep in the first place.

All of these changes impact our natural circadian rhythm, which is an essential internal “clock” that plays a key role in regulating our sleep pattern. It controls body temperature and hormones in order to make us feel alert during the day and tired at night.

 

Posted by m6beds in Alcohol and Sleep, Bed Buying Tips, Bed Care, Bed Cleaning Tips, Bedroom, Better Night’s Sleep, Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, m6, Make a Bed, Mattress Care, Mattress Type, Mattresses, Memory Foam Mattress, Sleep, Sleep Better, Sleep Disorders, Sleep Distruption, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Problems, Sleep Quality, Sleep study