Sleep study

Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Now we are officially entering the second lockdown in the UK M6 Beds have put together a few tips and tricks for getting your sleep cycle back into a routine.

You might have noticed your normal sleep pattern has changed. Some of us may be sleeping more, and some of us may be sleeping less. Life has changed dramatically for many of us, with our usual daily routine – including commutes, meal times, and the amount of time we spend outside – being altered because of self isolation.

  • Don’t use your bedroom as your office (if possible) When it’s time for bed, remove electronic devices and make the room cool, dark and quiet. It’s important to associate your bedroom as the place you go to sleep, not the place you work or watch TV. This will help you to relax and prepare for sleep. Electronic devices also emit artificial light that can influence our sleep cycle. Artificial light can trick your circadian clock into thinking daylight has been extended and alter our quality of sleep. If you need electronic devices nearby, place them in night mode.
  • Avoid napping As you try to establish your new routine, it’s important to engage with your natural circadian rhythm – and napping could potentially disrupt this at the beginning. However, if your previous night’s sleep was poor you may feel more tired after lunch. Short naps – less than 20 minutes – can help to restore cognitive function and may make you feel less sleepy.
  • Exercise Both aerobic and resistance exercise has been shown to have positive effects on sleep. However, timing is important. It’s best to avoid vigorous exercise one hour before bedtime as this may reduce our sleep duration, quality and make it more difficult to fall asleep in the first place.

All of these changes impact our natural circadian rhythm, which is an essential internal “clock” that plays a key role in regulating our sleep pattern. It controls body temperature and hormones in order to make us feel alert during the day and tired at night.

 

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Exposure to blue light from phones and computer screens ‘makes it harder to fall asleep’

Exposure to blue light from phones and computer screens ‘makes it harder to fall asleep’

Researchers say exposure to blue light could increase the risk of damage to eyesight and make it harder to fall asleep.

Work an arm’s length from the screen

Fully extend your arm and work from a distance – looking from your eyes to the end of your fingertips.

Use this as a minimum distance to reduce the stress on your eyeballs. 

20/20/20 

Simply put, every 20 minutes, look away from the screen for a minimum of 20 seconds at least 20 feet away.

This will help to reset your visual systems and eye through any long periods of screen work.

Screen height

Height and level of your working screen can have a big impact on eye strain and posture.

Research has shown that it is better for the screen to be located higher than the users’ watching level – the middle point should be 5-6 inches below the straight line of the users’ vision.

This makes the space between upper and lower eyelid more open, often resulting in dryness of the eyes.

Consider your device

Usually the biggest, newest phone is best, but not for your eyes. An iPhone X is 20 per cent brighter than an iPhone 6 and emits higher levels of blue light.

This is the difference of a 100 per cent increase in harmful blue light exposure!

Put a post-it note on your screen titled ‘BLINK’.

Normally, in a minute, we blink up to 20 times. This is controlled automatically by our central nervous systems so we’re not conscious of blinking.

While on screens, this is actually reduced to 3-5 times a minute meaning our tear films cannot be maintained and the eye does not remain lubricated.

A post-it-note on your monitor saying ‘Blink’ should help you consciously make an effort to blink. It’s simple but definitely works.

Advice

Buying a new bed or mattress is one of the most important purchases you can make and ensuring you pick the right one to suit your individual needs is incredibly important. There are so many different types of mattress, places to buy them from and varieties is feels and components, it can feel like a complete minefield!

Here at M6 Beds our aim to guide you through this minefield, showing you beds which best suit your needs, your required level of comfort and pressure relief required to get that restful night sleep. We’ve compiled a list of ‘common mistakes’ to avoid when mattress shopping to ensure you choose your perfect bed.

Posted by m6beds in Blue Light, Buy The Right Bed, Choosing The Right Mattress, Choosing the right pillows, comfy bed, Computer Screen, Coronavirus, COVID19, Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, Look After Your Bed, M6 Beds, Make a Bed, Mattress Care, Mattress Type, Mattresses, Pillow Choice, science of nodding off, Sleep, Sleep Better, Sleep Distruption, Sleep Quality, Sleep study, Temperature
Study shows one in three Britons working from home are no longer setting an alarm to wake up

Study shows one in three Britons working from home are no longer setting an alarm to wake up

How the coronavirus lockdown is impacting our sleeping habits: Study shows one in three Britons working from home are no longer setting an alarm to wake up.

An article from the Daily Mail have reported on a study from 23andMe suggesting that people are no longer setting alarms to wake up for work during the lockdown.

  • A survey for 23andMe found that people are now ‘naturally waking up’ at 7.06am
  • This is 48 minutes later than they used to wake up when they travelled to work
  • Sleep experts say this is allowing people to wake during the natural REM sleep 

A study for 23andMe found that the average wake-up time for people working from home had shifted by 48 minutes to 7.06am from 6.18am before the pandemic.

Researchers say this later wake-up time is much closer to the natural genetic wake up time of 7.55am and could have positive benefits on mood and brain function to aid a more productive day.

Sleep experts say waking up naturally increases our chances of doing so during REM sleep – which is the optimal state to transition from being asleep to being awake.

More people are also experiencing more vivid and intense dreams, something that could be due to waking during REM sleep.

‘Everyone dreams 4-5 times a night, but we can only remember a dream if we wake up during it,’ a sleep expert has said.

The study has also suggested that a fifth of Brits say they are struggling to get to sleep due to the lockdown keeping them indoors and not getting out and about with working like they typically would during an average day.

Posted by m6beds in Bed Buying Tips, Bed Care, Buy The Right Bed, Coronavirus, COVID19, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds, Mattress Care, Mattress Type, Mattresses, Memory Foam Mattress, Sleep study