Improve Sleep Patterns

Tips for Sleeping in the Heat

Tips for Sleeping in the Heat

Perhaps you’re familiar with this scenario: It’s late, you’re tossing and turning in bed, and no matter what, you simply can’t fall asleep. 

The problem? It’s far too hot. 

Humans have an ideal temperature for sleep, but when the weather isn’t cooperating and you can’t leave the AC running all night, what do you do? 

When you’re sleep deprived, cognitive performance drops, memory suffers, and you can struggle to stay focused. Eventually, even long-term memory can be affected.

Why is it hard to sleep in the heat?

The ideal temperature for a good night’s sleep is about 65°F (18.3 °C), give or take several degrees. Our body naturally drop in temperature during slumber, and it’s important to maintain the right sleeping environment so you can rest well all week long!

When it’s too hot, you’re more likely to toss and turn, which disrupts your sleep.

Before you go to sleep naturally, your body produces a hormone called melatonin which causes a drop in core body temperature that is needed for sleep.

This is why people sleep more during winter, as the nights are longer and cooler — meaning it’s easier for your body to reach a comfortable sleeping temperature.

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How to get the rest you need

How to get the rest you need

With increased daylight hours messing with your circadian rhythm, higher temps keeping you awake, and socializing affecting the quality of your sleep, it may feel like you’re fighting a losing battle. 

Don’t despair! There are ways you can get the rest you need during the longer summer days. 

You can start with the following tips.

Keep a consistent schedule

It’s important to go to bed on time and get up on time but it is also important to be realistic.

Decrease your exposure to light during the day

Decreasing your exposure to light, especially in the evening hours, can help your body prepare for sleep.

During the day, keep the curtains shut, in the evening, open the windows so as to create a breeze to cool the room.

Keep your nighttime temperature low

Keeping your space ventilated may improve sleep quality, Prop open a window or door, or use a fan.

Learn how to relax

If you learn how to relax on repeat, you can easily calm your system at night and fall asleep no matter what the season is doing. Find quiet ‘me times,’ even if it’s a few minutes here and there, to collect your thoughts.

It’s so important that we take the time to be able to regroup, calibrate, and de-stress during the day so we aren’t overloaded by the time our head hits the pillow.

Darken your room before bed

As the sun sets, our body clock signals that it’s time to sleep with melatonin release. As this chemical is secreted in response only at night-time and when there are no artificial lights or waves interference on its production; as soon as evening comes around – boom! You’re good for another hour of shut eye (or however long until your usual bedtime).

Use lightweight fabrics

If it’s higher temperatures that are bothering you, wear lightweight pajamas and using think bed sheets that wick away moisture.

Posted by m6beds in Deep Sleep, Hot Weather Sleep Hacks, Improve Sleep Patterns, M6 Beds, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Sleep Distruption, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Problems, Sleep Quality, Summer Bedroom, Summer Sleeping
Long Summer Days Affecting Your Sleep?

Long Summer Days Affecting Your Sleep?

It’s hard to sleep when the sun is high. Try these tips to rest easy.

Why is it harder to sleep in the summer?

Researchers found that waking times were earlier in the summer, while sleep issues such as insomnia and fatigue were less common in winter (although people can still have sleep issues in winter). 

Here are some reasons you may not be sleeping as well during summer.

Increased daylight hours

With the long days and high temperatures, it’s hard to get a good night’s sleep.

Your body clock, which is located in your brain, uses light and darkness as signals for day and night. The longer we ‘see’ light, the longer the body clock will tell the body it’s daytime and it needs to stay awake.

Delayed melatonin release

As the sun sets, our body clock signals that it’s time to sleep with melatonin release. As this chemical is secreted in response only at night-time and when there are no artificial lights or waves interference on its production; as soon as evening comes around – boom! You’re good for another hour of shut eye (or however long until your usual bedtime).

Stress

Sleep may be further disrupted if you’re stressed or have a lot on your mind. Hormones and chemicals play a huge role in our ability to maintain balance and homeostasis.

For example, the hormonal changes of menopause or the adrenal and chemical imbalances from anxiety and stress “will have a huge impact on our ability to release melatonin effectively and ultimately switch off.

Lifestyle factors

Lifestyle factors may also be at play. Because the days are longer, we generally do more, and also find our socializing increases. With the summertime lifestyle being more social, we may find we’re eating later and drinking more alcohol.

Higher temperatures

Combined with longer daylight hours, higher temperatures can also play a part in disrupting sleep. 

When we’re too warm, our body moves out of the relaxed state and very subtly moves into a heightened state of awareness.

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The Best Food to Have Before Bed

The Best Food to Have Before Bed

Getting good sleep is incredibly important for your overall health. 

It may reduce your risk of developing certain chronic illnesses, keep your brain healthy, and boost your immune system.

It’s generally recommended that you get between 7 and 9 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night, though many people struggle to get enough.

There are a lot of ways you can promote good sleep, including making changes to your diet. Some foods and drinks have been found by scientists or doctors as being effective in helping people get better restful nights’ slumbering!

Kiwi

Kiwis are a great low-calorie, nutritious fruit that can help people meet their daily vitamin C needs. One serving of kiwi contains just 42 calories and offers up an impressive amount vitamins including 71% DV for this valuable nutrient! It also provides women with 23%, while men get 31%.

Furthermore, eating kiwis may benefit your digestive health, reduce inflammation, and lower your cholesterol. These effects are due to the high amounts of fibre and carotenoid antioxidants that they provide.

According to studies on their potential to improve sleep quality, kiwis may also be one of the best foods to eat before bed.

In a 4-week study, 24 adults consumed two kiwifruits one hour before going to bed each night. At the end of the study, participants fell asleep 42% more quickly than when they didn’t eat anything before bedtime.

Additionally, their ability to sleep through the night without waking improved by 5%, while their total sleep time increased by 13%.

Kiwis are a great way to get your sleep cycle on track. They contain serotonin, which helps regulate the amount of time you spend in lightheadedness and drowsiness during REM cycles- when dreams occur!

It’s also been suggested that the anti-inflammatory antioxidants in kiwis, such as vitamin C and carotenoids, may be partly responsible for their sleep-promoting effects.

More scientific evidence is needed to determine the effects that kiwis may have in improving sleep. Nevertheless, eating 1–2 medium kiwis before bed may help you fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

White Rice

White rice has been stripped of its nutrient-rich bran and germ. The result is a lower fibre, more processed carbohydrate that doesn’t offer the same nutritional punch as brown does in comparison to white or even enriched varieties likeigerplus!

Nevertheless, white rice still contains a decent amount of a few vitamins and minerals.

White rice is high in carbs, providing 22 grams in a 4-ounce (79-gram) serving. Its carb content and lack of fiber contribute to its high glycemic index (GI). The glycemic index is a measure of how quickly a food increases your blood sugar.

It’s been suggested that eating foods with a high GI, such as white rice, at least 1 hour before bed may help improve sleep quality.

One study compared the sleep habits of 1,848 people based on their intake of rice, bread, or noodles. Higher rice intake was associated with better sleep than bread or noodles, including longer sleep duration.

Despite the potential role that eating white rice may have in promoting sleep, it’s best consumed in moderation due to its comparative low amounts of fiber and nutrients.

Other foods and drinks that may promote sleep

Several other foods and drinks have sleep-promoting properties. For example, they may contain high amounts of nutrients such as tryptophan. 

However, in some cases, there’s little research into their specific effects on sleep.

Dairy products: Dairy products, such as a glass of milk, cottage cheese, and plain yogurt, are known sources of tryptophan. Milk has been shown to improve sleep in older adults, especially when paired with light exercise.

Bananas: Banana peels contain tryptophan and the fruit itself is a modest source of magnesium. Both properties may help you get a good night’s sleep.

Oatmeal: Similar to rice, oatmeal is high in carbs with a bit more fiber and has been reported to induce drowsiness when consumed before bed. Additionally, oats are a known source of melatonin.

Posted by m6beds in Better Night’s Sleep, Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds, Mattress Type, Memory Foam Mattress, Sleep, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Quality, The Right Mattress
Benefits of Sleep

Benefits of Sleep

Sleep Boosts Immunity

You may be catching every cold and flu around, but it’s your bedtime that really does the trick. Prolonged lack of sleep can disrupt our immune system so we’re less able to fight off bugs!

Sleep can slim you

Sleeping less may lead to weight gain! Studies have shown that people who sleep 6 or fewer hours a day tend to put on more pounds than those with 7-hour stretches.
The risks for obesity are higher too, so if you’re struggling keep up your regular sleeping schedule tomorrow night (or any other).

It’s believed to be because sleep-deprived people have reduced levels of leptin (the chemical that makes you feel full) and increased levels of ghrelin (the hunger-stimulating hormone).

Sleep boosts mental wellbeing

Chronic sleep debt can lead to long-term mood disorders like clinical depression and generalised anxiety disorder in adults.


A single sleepless night may make you irritable or moody the following day, which is not surprising given that lack of proper rest has been linked with increased levels bad stress hormones throughout your body over time!

When people with anxiety or depression were surveyed to calculate their sleeping habits, it turned out that most of them slept for less than 6 hours a night.

Sleep prevents diabetes

Chronic sleep debt can lead to long-term mood disorders like clinical depression and generalised anxiety disorder in adults.


A single sleepless night may make you irritable or moody the following day, which is not surprising given that lack of proper rest has been linked with increased levels bad stress hormones throughout your body over time!

The connection between sleep and diabetes has been studied for years, but recently new research connects it with a surprising cause. When people don’t get enough good quality rest they are more likely to develop type 2 Diabetes because their bodies process glucose differently which can lead them into an energy crisis faster than normal.

Sleep wards off heart disease

The more you lack sleep, the harder your heart works to keep going. The link between long-standing sleeplessness and an increased workload on our vital organ may seem tenuous at best but studies show that there are serious consequences when this goes untreated including inflammation in addition to higher rates of hypertension or even stroke!

How to catch up on lost sleep

If you don’t get enough sleep, there’s only one way to compensate – getting more sleep.

It won’t happen with a single early night. If you’ve had months of restricted sleep, you’ll have built up a significant sleep debt, so expect recovery to take several weeks.

Starting on a weekend, try to add on an extra hour or 2 of sleep a night. The way to do this is to go to bed when you’re tired, and allow your body to wake you in the morning (no alarm clocks allowed!).

You might sleep up to 10 hours a night at first. After a while, the amount of time you sleep will gradually decrease to a normal level.

Don’t rely on caffeine or energy drinks as a short-term pick-me-up. They may boost your energy and concentration in the short term, but can disrupt your sleep patterns even further in the long term.

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What is a Sleep Diary?

What is a Sleep Diary?

A sleep diary is a daily record of your sleep habits. Often also known as a ‘sleep log’ or a ‘sleep journal’, they are popular among parents hoping to get their children into a routine or adults who feel fatigued.

Over a period of time, a diary is used to evaluate a person’s sleep and identify any recurring bad habits or interruptions, helping to diagnose a sleep disorder.

What should a sleep diary include?

There are many different formats a sleep diary can take. However, most will simply be a notebook where the following details are noted down following each sleep:

  • Bedtime 
  • Wake-up time 
  • How long it took to fall asleep (roughly) or if you have a smart watch this can track your hours
  • Number of sleep interruptions, and the period if prolonged 
  • Number of daytime naps (if any) 
  • Medication, exercise and any caffeine taken

Are There Sleep Diary Apps?

If you think you may forget to fill out a sleep diary daily, downloading a sleep app could help – especially if your phone is permanently attached to your hip. There are many different free and paid sleep diary apps that can help monitor your snooze time, REM sleep cycles and provide tips for improving rest quality. Some of the most popular include:

Sleep As Android

This is primarily an intelligent alarm clock app that helps wake you gently in the morning. However, it also has decent sleep cycle tracking capabilities and is compatible with wearable tracking devices such as Galaxy Watches and Fitbits.

It can score your sleep on duration, deficit, deep sleep percentage, snoring, efficiency and irregularity. Should you want to, you can even record your sleep talking using the app.

Sleep Time

This is a sleep analysis app and an alarm clock in one. It tracks your sleep cycle and quality, measures your resting heart rate when you wake up, and provides soothing soundscapes, to name a few features.

Pillow

An Apple app that can sync up with your Apple Watch, Pillow is a smart sleep assistant and will automatically analyse your sleep cycles. 

Like the other apps on this list, it has audio recording technology and alarm options. It can also suggest an optimal bedtime based on your recorded data, show your sleep trends, and allows you to add notes should you want to track the influence of food, drink, medication or exercise on your quality and length of sleep.

Posted by m6beds in Better Night’s Sleep, Deep Sleep, Improve Sleep Patterns, M6 Beds, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Problems, Sleeping Apps
How to sleep in hot weather if you share a bed with someone else

How to sleep in hot weather if you share a bed with someone else

Following the recent heatwave we have compiled a list of top tips on how to get the best night’s sleep possible when sharing a bed with someone.

We’ve all been there. Rolling around in sticky sheets, flipping your pillow every four minutes, desperately hoping a breeze is going to find its way through your window.

Every year, on the rare days where the temperature skirts 30 degrees, we all basically develop heatwave insomnia. And it’s even worse if you share a bed.

No amount of pillow-flipping or duvet-turning can counter the additional heat that comes from another human body – but if you don’t want to opt for separate beds (or don’t have an additional sleeping space), there are things you can try.

Here’s a few ideas for how you can sleep better in this heat.

Take a cool shower

Just before you go to bed, take a cool shower to bring your body temperature down. Your body temperature needs to drop when you go to sleep, giving it a helping hand by cooling off in a cool shower should help you get to sleep faster.

Ditch your duvet

If you are someone that needs to sleep under the covers at night opt for a straight cotton bedsheet or quilt cotton cover- and if there are two of you, have one each. This will ensure moisture wicks away from each individual and bed-sharers don’t end up sticking to each other.

Sleep alone

Sorry lovers, if the heat is really too much you may have to sleep apart.

The good news is that heat rises, so the person banished to the sofa for the sweaty evening is likely to have a cooler night’s sleep.

Posted by m6beds in Better Night’s Sleep, Hot Weather, Hot Weather Sleep Hacks, Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds
Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Tips to get your sleep cycle back on track during lockdown

Now we are officially entering the second lockdown in the UK M6 Beds have put together a few tips and tricks for getting your sleep cycle back into a routine.

You might have noticed your normal sleep pattern has changed. Some of us may be sleeping more, and some of us may be sleeping less. Life has changed dramatically for many of us, with our usual daily routine – including commutes, meal times, and the amount of time we spend outside – being altered because of self isolation.

  • Don’t use your bedroom as your office (if possible) When it’s time for bed, remove electronic devices and make the room cool, dark and quiet. It’s important to associate your bedroom as the place you go to sleep, not the place you work or watch TV. This will help you to relax and prepare for sleep. Electronic devices also emit artificial light that can influence our sleep cycle. Artificial light can trick your circadian clock into thinking daylight has been extended and alter our quality of sleep. If you need electronic devices nearby, place them in night mode.
  • Avoid napping As you try to establish your new routine, it’s important to engage with your natural circadian rhythm – and napping could potentially disrupt this at the beginning. However, if your previous night’s sleep was poor you may feel more tired after lunch. Short naps – less than 20 minutes – can help to restore cognitive function and may make you feel less sleepy.
  • Exercise Both aerobic and resistance exercise has been shown to have positive effects on sleep. However, timing is important. It’s best to avoid vigorous exercise one hour before bedtime as this may reduce our sleep duration, quality and make it more difficult to fall asleep in the first place.

All of these changes impact our natural circadian rhythm, which is an essential internal “clock” that plays a key role in regulating our sleep pattern. It controls body temperature and hormones in order to make us feel alert during the day and tired at night.

 

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How to get a good nights sleep in winter

How to get a good nights sleep in winter

Tips for staying warm and cosy this winter. 

Consider your bedding

This might sound obvious, but thicker, heavier bedding will help increase your body temperature on a cold night.

Opt for a duvet with a higher tog rating, which is a measure of how well the duvet can trap warm air. A 10.5 tog will keep you warm if you have good central heating, while those who want even more warmth from their bedding might prefer a rating of 13.5.

Cuddle a hot water bottle

The humble hot water bottle is a brilliantly inexpensive way of keeping warm on even the coldest of nights. We recommend opting for one that has a soft cover on it, both to prevent scalding and to keep the bottle’s heat insulated long into the night.

Research has also shown that nestling your feet underneath a hot water bottle will naturally switch on the body’s sleep mechanism, helping you on your way to a restful night’s sleep.

Soak in a hot bath

Nothing will warm you up and calm your mind quite like a hot, soothing bubble bath. The advantages are twofold, as the warm water works to relax your muscles while the sudden dip in body temperature when you leave the bath helps send you off into a deeper sleep. Research has shown that our body temperature naturally dips just before we fall asleep, so this increased drop in temperature helps us fall asleep even faster.

Wear pyjamas

If your underwear simply isn’t cutting it for keeping you cosy in bed, then it may be time to invest in some pyjamas. Opt for styles made out of natural fibres such as a cotton and silk as these will keep you warmer than synthetic materials.

Posted by m6beds in Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds, Make a Bed, Mattress Care, Old mattress, Sleep Better, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Quality, winter tiredness
Wipe out winter tiredness

Wipe out winter tiredness

We all know the struggle of getting out of bed during the winter months while it is still dark outside and the temperature has dropped. If this sounds familiar, you’re not alone. Many people feel tired and sluggish during winter.

M6 beds have put together some energy giving solutions that may help – and some conditions that can sometimes be the cause. 

Let in some sunlight

As the days become shorter, your sleep and waking cycles may become disrupted. The lack of sunlight means your brain produces more of a hormone called melatonin, which makes you sleepy.

Open your blinds or curtains as soon as you get up to let more sunlight into your home, and get outdoors in natural daylight as much as possible. Try to take even just a brief lunchtime walk, and make sure your workplace and home are as light and airy as possible.

Ensure you get enough sleep

Getting enough undisturbed sleep is vital for fighting off winter tiredness.

It’s tempting to go into hibernation mode when winter hits, but that sleepy feeling you get does not mean you should snooze for longer.

In fact, if you sleep too much, chances are you’ll feel even more sluggish during the day. We do not actually need any more sleep in winter than we do in summer – aim for about 7-8 hours of shut-eye a night, and try to go to bed and get up at the same time every day.

Make sure your bedroom helps you feel relaxed and sleepy: clear the clutter, have comfortable and warm bedding, and turn off the TV.

Eat the right food

Being overweight or underweight can affect your energy levels and leave you feeling sleepy. So it’s important to make sure you eat a healthy, balanced diet.

Once the summer ends, there’s a temptation to ditch the salads and fill up on starchy foods such as pasta, potatoes and bread. However, you’ll have more energy if you include plenty of fruit and vegetables in your comfort meals.

Winter vegetables – such as carrots, parsnips, swede and turnips – can be roasted, mashed or made into soup to provide a warming winter meal for the whole family. And classic stews and casseroles are great options if they’re made with lean meat or pulses, and plenty of veg.

 

Posted by m6beds in Bedroom, Choose Your Perfect Mattress, Choosing The Right Mattress, Coronavirus, Improve Sleep Patterns, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds, Make a Bed, Mattress Type, Sleep Better, Sleep Problems, Sleep Quality, winter tiredness