Sleep Cycle

The Best Food to Have Before Bed

The Best Food to Have Before Bed

Getting good sleep is incredibly important for your overall health. 

It may reduce your risk of developing certain chronic illnesses, keep your brain healthy, and boost your immune system.

It’s generally recommended that you get between 7 and 9 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night, though many people struggle to get enough.

There are a lot of ways you can promote good sleep, including making changes to your diet. Some foods and drinks have been found by scientists or doctors as being effective in helping people get better restful nights’ slumbering!

Kiwi

Kiwis are a great low-calorie, nutritious fruit that can help people meet their daily vitamin C needs. One serving of kiwi contains just 42 calories and offers up an impressive amount vitamins including 71% DV for this valuable nutrient! It also provides women with 23%, while men get 31%.

Furthermore, eating kiwis may benefit your digestive health, reduce inflammation, and lower your cholesterol. These effects are due to the high amounts of fibre and carotenoid antioxidants that they provide.

According to studies on their potential to improve sleep quality, kiwis may also be one of the best foods to eat before bed.

In a 4-week study, 24 adults consumed two kiwifruits one hour before going to bed each night. At the end of the study, participants fell asleep 42% more quickly than when they didn’t eat anything before bedtime.

Additionally, their ability to sleep through the night without waking improved by 5%, while their total sleep time increased by 13%.

Kiwis are a great way to get your sleep cycle on track. They contain serotonin, which helps regulate the amount of time you spend in lightheadedness and drowsiness during REM cycles- when dreams occur!

It’s also been suggested that the anti-inflammatory antioxidants in kiwis, such as vitamin C and carotenoids, may be partly responsible for their sleep-promoting effects.

More scientific evidence is needed to determine the effects that kiwis may have in improving sleep. Nevertheless, eating 1–2 medium kiwis before bed may help you fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

White Rice

White rice has been stripped of its nutrient-rich bran and germ. The result is a lower fibre, more processed carbohydrate that doesn’t offer the same nutritional punch as brown does in comparison to white or even enriched varieties likeigerplus!

Nevertheless, white rice still contains a decent amount of a few vitamins and minerals.

White rice is high in carbs, providing 22 grams in a 4-ounce (79-gram) serving. Its carb content and lack of fiber contribute to its high glycemic index (GI). The glycemic index is a measure of how quickly a food increases your blood sugar.

It’s been suggested that eating foods with a high GI, such as white rice, at least 1 hour before bed may help improve sleep quality.

One study compared the sleep habits of 1,848 people based on their intake of rice, bread, or noodles. Higher rice intake was associated with better sleep than bread or noodles, including longer sleep duration.

Despite the potential role that eating white rice may have in promoting sleep, it’s best consumed in moderation due to its comparative low amounts of fiber and nutrients.

Other foods and drinks that may promote sleep

Several other foods and drinks have sleep-promoting properties. For example, they may contain high amounts of nutrients such as tryptophan. 

However, in some cases, there’s little research into their specific effects on sleep.

Dairy products: Dairy products, such as a glass of milk, cottage cheese, and plain yogurt, are known sources of tryptophan. Milk has been shown to improve sleep in older adults, especially when paired with light exercise.

Bananas: Banana peels contain tryptophan and the fruit itself is a modest source of magnesium. Both properties may help you get a good night’s sleep.

Oatmeal: Similar to rice, oatmeal is high in carbs with a bit more fiber and has been reported to induce drowsiness when consumed before bed. Additionally, oats are a known source of melatonin.

Posted by m6beds in Better Night’s Sleep, Improve Sleep Patterns, Invest In A Bigger Bed, Investing in a Bed, M6 Beds, Mattress Type, Memory Foam Mattress, Sleep, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Quality, The Right Mattress
Do’s and Dont’s After a Bad Night’s Sleep

Do’s and Dont’s After a Bad Night’s Sleep

Don’t hit the snooze button

What a sweet relief! You’re not getting enough sleep and the 10 minutes is all that’s needed to give your body an extra boost of energy. Right? Not really- it takes up to 1 hour for this method work its magic, otherwise known as “stress Reduction.”

Don’t Sleep In

You decide to take the morning off. You can make up that sleep from 9 to noon, right? Tempting, but probably a bad idea. You set your body’s “internal clock” when you go to bed and get up at the same time each day. It’s best to stick to that routine, even if you didn’t sleep well. It’ll help get your cycle back on track.

Do: Get Some Sun

It helps your body set its clock. It can also help counter sleeplessness by helping your mood and brain. So if you want to get more sleep tonight than last night, wake up and greet the light of the day. It helps to get out in the middle of the day, too. If you’re in an office, maybe take a little stroll through the park around lunchtime.

Do: Get some caffeine, but not too much

Have some coffee to stay alert and energized throughout your day. The caffeine will leave your system within a few hours, so don’t overdo it! If you skip breakfast or have late night snacks containing this powerful drug then we recommend having one cup in the morning before working; try not exceed 2 cups per 24-hour span unless prescribed by an medical professional due largely because of possible negative side effects like raised heartbeat (which can also happen when consuming too much).

Don’t: Surf the Internet

If you want a good night’s sleep, then it is important that your body receives darkness and quietness as well. To avoid too much “blue light” from messing with this schedule in order to get better quality rest – try turning off all electronics an hour before bedtime or keeping them out of sight when not being used so they don’t stimulate our minds during those late-night hours trying desperately for some shut eye!

Do: Hydrate

You want to drink enough fluids so that you don’t wake up thirsty in the middle of the night, but not so much that you wake up because you need to pee. And of course, avoid alcohol and caffeine close to bedtime.

Posted by m6beds in M6 Beds, Mattress Care, mattress protector, Mattress Type, Mattresses, New Bed, New Pillow, Replace your bed, Sleep, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle
What is a Sleep Diary?

What is a Sleep Diary?

A sleep diary is a daily record of your sleep habits. Often also known as a ‘sleep log’ or a ‘sleep journal’, they are popular among parents hoping to get their children into a routine or adults who feel fatigued.

Over a period of time, a diary is used to evaluate a person’s sleep and identify any recurring bad habits or interruptions, helping to diagnose a sleep disorder.

What should a sleep diary include?

There are many different formats a sleep diary can take. However, most will simply be a notebook where the following details are noted down following each sleep:

  • Bedtime 
  • Wake-up time 
  • How long it took to fall asleep (roughly) or if you have a smart watch this can track your hours
  • Number of sleep interruptions, and the period if prolonged 
  • Number of daytime naps (if any) 
  • Medication, exercise and any caffeine taken

Are There Sleep Diary Apps?

If you think you may forget to fill out a sleep diary daily, downloading a sleep app could help – especially if your phone is permanently attached to your hip. There are many different free and paid sleep diary apps that can help monitor your snooze time, REM sleep cycles and provide tips for improving rest quality. Some of the most popular include:

Sleep As Android

This is primarily an intelligent alarm clock app that helps wake you gently in the morning. However, it also has decent sleep cycle tracking capabilities and is compatible with wearable tracking devices such as Galaxy Watches and Fitbits.

It can score your sleep on duration, deficit, deep sleep percentage, snoring, efficiency and irregularity. Should you want to, you can even record your sleep talking using the app.

Sleep Time

This is a sleep analysis app and an alarm clock in one. It tracks your sleep cycle and quality, measures your resting heart rate when you wake up, and provides soothing soundscapes, to name a few features.

Pillow

An Apple app that can sync up with your Apple Watch, Pillow is a smart sleep assistant and will automatically analyse your sleep cycles. 

Like the other apps on this list, it has audio recording technology and alarm options. It can also suggest an optimal bedtime based on your recorded data, show your sleep trends, and allows you to add notes should you want to track the influence of food, drink, medication or exercise on your quality and length of sleep.

Posted by m6beds in Better Night’s Sleep, Deep Sleep, Improve Sleep Patterns, M6 Beds, Sleep Better, Sleep Cycle, Sleep Patterns, Sleep Problems, Sleeping Apps
What is Deep Sleep?

What is Deep Sleep?

We all know that getting your head down for seven, eight, or nine hours of sleep each night is optimum for health and wellbeing – but is it as easy as just tallying up those hours? 

The quality and type of sleep you’re getting is just as valuable as the amount of sleep you get each night. One of the most vital stages of sleep is “deep sleep”. This guide discusses what deep sleep is, where it comes in the sleep cycle, and how you can ensure you’re getting enough of it.  

How Deep Sleep Fits into the Sleep Cycle 

A night’s sleep contains five distinctive stages. The first four are non-REM (Rapid Eye Movement) sleep stages and the fifth and final is a REM sleep cycle.  

Deep sleep occurs during stages three and four, which are both non-REM sleep stages. During the deep sleep period your body will be: 

  • In its calmest state – your heartbeat and breathing are slow, and your muscles are relaxed 
  • Relaxed and switched off – your brain activity is at its lowest throughout the whole cycle 
  • Cool – your body temperature is at its lowest 
  • Fast asleep – it’s more difficult to wake up during deep sleep than in any other sleep stage 

Occurring in the first half of the night, the first cycle of deep sleep lasts from 45 to 90 minutes. Subsequent deep sleep stages do occur, but they will gradually shorten in time. Once complete, your sleep cycle moves to REM sleep, where your heart rate and breathing increase and you’re most likely to dream. 

Why Deep Sleep is so Important 

Deep sleep is the most important sleep stage to maintaining good health and wellbeing. During deep sleep, your body and mind are in the best place to recover. The following takes place during deep sleep:  

  • Repair and growth of muscle tissues and bones 
  • Reinforcement of immune system 
  • Restoration of energy levels  
  • Rebalancing of blood sugar levels and metabolism 
  • Consolidation of memories 

Ultimately, deep sleep is your body’s opportunity to recover and repair, both mentally and physically. The more deep sleep you’re able to get, the more your body is able to recover.  

How Much Deep Sleep Should I Get? 

According to the Institute of Medicine Committee on Sleep Medicine and Research, a healthy human should get around 13%-23% of deep sleep every night. Based on eight hours of sleep, that amounts to between 62 and 110 minutes.  

Of course, people of different ages require different amounts of sleep. This is particularly true of children. Toddlers require 11-14 hours each night, and that number decreases slowly to around 8-10 for teenagers. Keeping the same principle as above, children require more deep sleep than adults to recover sufficiently for the next day. 

Posted by m6beds in Deep Sleep, M6 Beds, Sleep Cycle