The Best Food to Have Before Bed

Getting good sleep is incredibly important for your overall health. 

It may reduce your risk of developing certain chronic illnesses, keep your brain healthy, and boost your immune system.

It’s generally recommended that you get between 7 and 9 hours of uninterrupted sleep each night, though many people struggle to get enough.

There are a lot of ways you can promote good sleep, including making changes to your diet. Some foods and drinks have been found by scientists or doctors as being effective in helping people get better restful nights’ slumbering!

Kiwi

Kiwis are a great low-calorie, nutritious fruit that can help people meet their daily vitamin C needs. One serving of kiwi contains just 42 calories and offers up an impressive amount vitamins including 71% DV for this valuable nutrient! It also provides women with 23%, while men get 31%.

Furthermore, eating kiwis may benefit your digestive health, reduce inflammation, and lower your cholesterol. These effects are due to the high amounts of fibre and carotenoid antioxidants that they provide.

According to studies on their potential to improve sleep quality, kiwis may also be one of the best foods to eat before bed.

In a 4-week study, 24 adults consumed two kiwifruits one hour before going to bed each night. At the end of the study, participants fell asleep 42% more quickly than when they didn’t eat anything before bedtime.

Additionally, their ability to sleep through the night without waking improved by 5%, while their total sleep time increased by 13%.

Kiwis are a great way to get your sleep cycle on track. They contain serotonin, which helps regulate the amount of time you spend in lightheadedness and drowsiness during REM cycles- when dreams occur!

It’s also been suggested that the anti-inflammatory antioxidants in kiwis, such as vitamin C and carotenoids, may be partly responsible for their sleep-promoting effects.

More scientific evidence is needed to determine the effects that kiwis may have in improving sleep. Nevertheless, eating 1–2 medium kiwis before bed may help you fall asleep faster and stay asleep longer.

White Rice

White rice has been stripped of its nutrient-rich bran and germ. The result is a lower fibre, more processed carbohydrate that doesn’t offer the same nutritional punch as brown does in comparison to white or even enriched varieties likeigerplus!

Nevertheless, white rice still contains a decent amount of a few vitamins and minerals.

White rice is high in carbs, providing 22 grams in a 4-ounce (79-gram) serving. Its carb content and lack of fiber contribute to its high glycemic index (GI). The glycemic index is a measure of how quickly a food increases your blood sugar.

It’s been suggested that eating foods with a high GI, such as white rice, at least 1 hour before bed may help improve sleep quality.

One study compared the sleep habits of 1,848 people based on their intake of rice, bread, or noodles. Higher rice intake was associated with better sleep than bread or noodles, including longer sleep duration.

Despite the potential role that eating white rice may have in promoting sleep, it’s best consumed in moderation due to its comparative low amounts of fiber and nutrients.

Other foods and drinks that may promote sleep

Several other foods and drinks have sleep-promoting properties. For example, they may contain high amounts of nutrients such as tryptophan. 

However, in some cases, there’s little research into their specific effects on sleep.

Dairy products: Dairy products, such as a glass of milk, cottage cheese, and plain yogurt, are known sources of tryptophan. Milk has been shown to improve sleep in older adults, especially when paired with light exercise.

Bananas: Banana peels contain tryptophan and the fruit itself is a modest source of magnesium. Both properties may help you get a good night’s sleep.

Oatmeal: Similar to rice, oatmeal is high in carbs with a bit more fiber and has been reported to induce drowsiness when consumed before bed. Additionally, oats are a known source of melatonin.